Frequently Asked Questions

When can I apply for the Peace First Prize?

Peace First will be announcing new programming in the fall and therefore we are not currently accepting applications. Please check out our social media pages for any updates on the Peace First Prize.

How does Peace First define peacemaking?

Peacemaking is the creative process of engaging with others to make positive and lasting change. Check out our criteria for more information.

How can I tell if a project is a good fit for the Peace First Prize?

We are looking for projects that are well underway, ongoing, or have already taken place. We are also looking for projects that reflect our peacemaking criteria. For examples, check out last year’s winners. If you are not sure, we still encourage you to apply— the process doesn’t take long!

Can I apply for a future project I'm planning?

Eligible projects are those that have already been completed, are in process, or are ongoing. The focus of the Peace First Prize is recognizing the change and impact that young people have already made happen. So, while applications need to focus on existing or past projects, feel free to let us know what other projects you are planning as a peacemaker.

Who is eligible for the Peace First Prize?

Citizens or legal residents of the United States and Territories who are between the ages of 8 and 22 years old (as of January 1, 2015) are eligible to apply for the Peace First Prize. All projects must have taken place in the United States. Family members of Peace First staff and board members are not eligible.

What do Peace First Prize winners receive?

Peace First Prize winners each receive a Peace First Fellowship: $25,000 over two years to further their education and peacemaking work. They also receive training, mentoring and professional development.

How can the Peace First Prize money be used?

The Peace First Prize money will be disbursed over two years and can either to support an ongoing peacemaking project with a registered nonprofit organization or be used toward winners' education. All uses of funds are subject to the approval of Peace First. See our official rules for more information.

Why do children under 13 need a parent or legal guardian’s consent to apply for the Peace First Prize?

Federal law prohibits the collection of personal information from anyone under the age of 13 without consent from a parent or legal guardian. The law also requires parental permission for children under 18 to apply. Individuals between the ages of 8-12 must have a parent or legal guardian provide his or her contact information where requested. We’ll contact them with any updates throughout the Peace First Prize selection process.

When will I hear back about being invited to the next round of selection?

We will notify you if you have been selected for the semi-finalist round by the end of May.

I nominated someone, why don’t I see an email?

When you nominate someone, two messages are automatically sent to the two email addresses you provide in your nomination form— yours, and the nominee’s. Check your inbox for an email from This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. (we’ve partnered with Wizehive to support our online forms). If you are still not seeing a confirmation message, please check your spam folder. Depending on your email settings, the message may have landed there. Still no luck? Get in touch with us: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. .

Someone nominated me, why didn’t I get an email?

If someone nominated you, an email was sent to the email address the nominator provided for you. Check your inbox for an email from This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. (we’ve partnered with Wizehive to help us with our online forms). If you are still not seeing a confirmation message, please check your spam folder—depending on your email settings, the message may have landed there. Still no luck? Get in touch with us: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. .

What if my project happened outside of the U.S.?

Only projects that took place in the U.S. are eligible for the Peace First Prize. While we recognize and value the importance of peacemaking internationally, we are looking for projects that focus their impact on individuals and communities within the U.S.

Can groups apply for the Peace First Prize?

Peace First Prize entries are limited to individuals. Groups, commercial enterprises, and business entities are not eligible.

Can I submit a video with my application?

We welcome applicants to submit videos with their applications! Videos are not required, but will help us share your story, and will increase your chances of getting featured on our website.

I want to submit a video with my application, what are the requirements?

If you choose to submit a video with your application, we ask that you keep it under 2 minutes long. Please share the video with us by posting it to Youtube, and providing the link to your video within the application. If you prefer you can post this as an unlisted video (it is unsearchable, and people can only view it if they have the direct link).

What does Peace First mean by “storytelling”? What do you share?

The Peace First Prize is about more than just recognizing a few young people. Throughout the process, we want to share and celebrate thousands of stories about how youth like you are creating positive change. We will be conscious of your privacy in sharing information and limit personal information to name, state, age, and photos/videos if included. For some examples, take a look at some Peacemaker Profiles. For more information about what we share, see our full Official Rules and Story Release.

If I applied for the Peace First Prize last year, can I apply again? What if I was a semi-finalist or finalist?

Previous applicants are eligible to apply for the Peace First Prize again. This includes finalists and semi-finalists (but does not include Peace First Fellows; as previous winners of the Peace First Prize, Fellows are ineligible for future Prizes).

What if I still have questions?

Still have questions after reviewing the information on our website? Email us at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. . Or call the Prize Team at 617-261-3833 x309 if you do not have email access. Be patient as it may take us a bit to get back to you!

How else can I get involved?

The Peace First Prize is about more than identifying winners. It’s an opportunity to inspire other young people to become peacemakers and learn about resources for peacemaking. Visit the Peacemaking Resources page to find peacemaking tools. Connect with us through our social media channels: Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Pinterest, and Youtube. Or visit the main Peace First homepage to find other ways to get involved with Peace First’s peacemaking movement.

What can I win if I apply or nominate early?

If you apply or nominate a young person for the Peace First Prize by February 6, 2014, you will be entered into a drawing for a chance to donate $100 to the peacemaking organization of your choice. See full rules here.

When is the deadline to nominate or apply?

Nominations and applications for the third annual Peace First Prize have closed.

Read 955648 times Last modified on Saturday, 04 January 2014 16:39

2015 peace first prize winners

Brennan

brennan projectBrennan Lewis, 18, Apex, NC

Growing up a member of the LGBTQ community in rural North Carolina, Brennan saw firsthand the difficulties and feelings of isolation that LGBTQ youth can endure in a heteronormative, and rural, environment. And while Brennan was very fortunate to have a loving support system in their family and friends, they saw others who weren’t as lucky. So with a strong sense of compassion, Brennan and a friend took action and courageously created QueerNC.

Grace

grace projectGrace Callwood, 10, Abingdon, MD

Grace is a cancer survivor who learned, through giving away clothing that didn’t fit her post-treatment, that anyone and everyone can help brighten the day of their neighbor. The girls who received Grace’s donation had just moved into a homeless housing complex and were thrilled to be getting new clothes for school. After hearing what a difference her donation made in their day, Grace wanted to help other children who were going through tough times.

Jasmine

jasmine projectJasmine Babers, 19, Rock Island, IL

After watching her best friend and sister endure bullying and witnessing the devastating effects that it can have on them, Jasmine decided it was time someone created an outlet to promote compassion and tolerance among young women.

Xiuhtezcatl

xiuhtezcatl project 2Xiuhtezcatl Martinez, 15, Boulder, CO

Growing up, Xiuhtezcatl’s father emphasized his obligation to taking care of the land – a privilege and responsibility that, in a world ravaged by climate change, he does not take lightly. He has been on the front lines of the fight for the environment since he was four, attending and leading rallies and summits, always willing to confront adult leaders for the current climate crisis we see today.

Yasmine

yasminearringtonactionphototwoYasmine Arrington, 22, Washington D.C.

2.7 million young people in the US have an incarcerated parent, and statistics show that they are more likely to drop out of high school and go to jail themselves because of it. Yasmine is one of those 2.7 million; she has experienced firsthand the financial and emotional burdens, and the marginalization that a family goes through as a result. And through building a meaningful relationship with her incarcerated parent, by forgiving him, she was motivated to do something to support her peers and help them find their own peace of mind and end this cycle of incarceration.

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